Captioning Coming Up!

May 7, 2011 § 1 Comment

There’s such a high level of activity right now in the CCAC Members’ Forum online, and it’s great.  Some of it, naturally, is about captioning inclusion for cinema and theaters. Some of it is for many other venues – e.g. sports stadiums, any youtube video you want captioning for, and more.

Other captioning needed at times here:  the medical conference that your family has coming up, the job interview you need, a community meeting where you want to voice your views and “hear” others’ points fully; a political campaign that needs your understanding, and more….

While categories outside of “entertainment” are more complicated to tackle, we aim to kep trying in the CCAC! Coming up – we need your participation and support also.

Participation in CCAC Member discussions online is available four ways for your convenience (if you become a member): each message by email, the digest (one email a day with a listing of all messages), the abridged (one email a day with the subjects), or no email at all and you participate from the CCAC forum webpage itself (a googlegroup for now).

If you elect the abridged or no emails, it’s important to be a “google user” also, and remind yourself to ‘go to’ the CCAC forum regularly, or when you have time. To become a google user, for many who may not use google for anything yet (smile) — simply “sign up” and “sign in” with your own email address and your own password.

However, you don’t need anything at all to have the group send you an email for all discussions. You don’t pay anything either :-). And you only need to understand how important more advocacy for inclusion of quality captioning is.

We coined these E’s to Express our Entire Effort in the CCAC these days: (send us your E’s too!) —  Enthusiasm, Expertise, Enjoyment, Experience, and Excellence.

No Excuses – if you support captioning inclusion for so many good reasons, universally, the time to join the CCAC is now.

Advertisements

§ One Response to Captioning Coming Up!

  • C A P T I O N S F O R L I T E R A C Y
    a 501 (c ) (3) charitable trust
    ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
    J O H N Y E A T M A N T A G G A R T , T R U S T E E & D I R E C T O R
    L A U R A L O U M E A D O W S, T R U S T E E & E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R
    3 5 1 E A S T 8 4 T H S T R E E T, 2 2 B, N E W Y O R K , N Y 1 0 0 2 8 – 4 4 5 7
    T E L E P H O N E 1 – 2 1 2 – 8 6 1 – 9 6 8 3 , F A X 1 – 2 1 2 – 8 6 1 – 0 0 3 0
    E – M A I L: C A P T I O N S L I T E R A C Y @ H O T M A I L . C O M
    W E B S I T E: W W W. C A P T I O N S F O R L I T E R A C Y . O R G

    May 10, 2011

    When kids don’t learn to read in class, it isn’t always because the teacher needs more training. It may be because of the nature of the children’s home life.

    Some Kids Don’t Learn To Read In School The NAEP results, when analyzed by ethnicity or language, show that over 50% of black and Hispanic students fail to read at the basic level by the 4th grade. This achievement gap is real. But it can be helped outside the classroom with free TV captions.

    Free TV Captions Can Help In a brief video, former President Bill Clinton, at his Clinton Global Initiative, praises the use of Same Language Subtitles (comparable to TV captions in the US) that have taught millions in India to read from television, see http://www.captionsforliteracy.org with the Clinton video as the website comes up, along with a short video of a boy learning to read and write from TV captions. Or go to http://www.planetread.org to see precisely how the TV captions, or SLS, appear on television in India.

    How TV Captions Help Learning To Read Free TV captions create an unrivaled opportunity for learners to connect the sound of the spoken word with the sight of the printed word in the context of the action unfolding on the screen to explain and reinforce the meaning. Opening the closed TV captions transforms television into a free reading practice resource. TV captions may not help everyone right away, but over time, many struggling readers will profit and learn.

    Not More Television, But Better Television With TV Captions Of course, free TV captions are only a supplement not a substitute for credentialed instructors. But when an average kid watches television 4 to 7 hours a day, turning on free TV captions provides thousands of hours a year for students to enhance their classroom learning by practicing reading at home.

    Selecting Television Programs Pediatricians have recanted prior objections in a March 2009 about face in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, concluding that “television viewing between birth and 2 years of age was neither beneficial nor deleterious to child cognitive … abilities at 3 years of age.” As the pediatrician Dimitri A. Christakis, MD, and Professor Frederick J. Zimmerman, PhD, conclude in their 2006 book, The Elephant in the Living Room, television can be entertaining, broadening and educational, “It just has to be used properly.”

    Federal Legislation Is In Place, The Research Has Been Done Since January 2006, federal mandates require free TV captions to be available 20 out of 24 hours a day (generally not between 2am and 6am) on virtually all programs. Initially, organizations for the deaf lobbied for TV captions, but the FCC recognizes that they are valuable as well for learning to read. One national organization for the deaf also has recognized the value of TV captions to help struggling readers, see http://www.readcaptionsacrossamerica.org. For a listing of over 25 years of rigorous scientific research validating the effectiveness of TV captions for learning to read, see studies listed at the research tab on the website http://www.captionsforliteracy.org.

    How To Turn On TV Captions Free TV captions can be turned on with a click of the CC button on the remote control or by the use of the set’s menu. Using the television’s menu often needs a reader to plow through menu choices. An FCC website also has instructions on how to turn on TV captions with menus.

    How You Can Help We urge you to harness your formidable platform to tell your viewers, families, children and teachers about the near universal availability of free TV captions and their value for learning to read. You can help by copying, distributing and displaying the following posters, featuring TV captions on your website, including a link to our website on yours, perhaps letting us provide you with a short article for your website.

    How Can We Help You? Let us know your ideas on how to spread the word about TV captions. We look forward to hearing from you.

    John Yeatman Taggart Laura Lou Meadows
    Director Executive Director

    WITH TV CAPTIONS
    YOU CAN TRANSFORM YOUR TELEVISION
    INTO FREE READING PRACTICE

    Who do you know who needs help learning to read?

     A three year old who needs print aware¬ness to start kindergarten?

     The 4th grader who is in the bottom third of the class who can’t yet read at the basic level?

     The disabled homebound child?

     The underserved inner city youth?

     The kid who is so discouraged with trying to read 11th grade texts that he wants to drop out of high school?

     The Spanish speaking carpenter who needs to read the mysterious English instructions for his electric saw?

    Opening the closed TV captions creates an unrivalled opportunity to connect the sound of the spoken word with the sight of the printed word in the context of the picture and the action unfolding on the screen to explain and reinforce the meaning of the words. It’s like having the story read aloud.

    See the brief video of former President Bill Clinton endorsing the use of same language subtitles (comparable to TV captions in the US) to teach millions in India to read at http://www.captionsforliteracy.org along with a short video of a boy learning to read and write with TV captions.

    Now you can turn on the priceless free resource of TV captions with a touch of the CC button on the remote control or with the use of the television’s menu. Since January 2006 by federal mandate, TV captions are there 20 out of 24 hours a day (usually not between 2am & 6am) every day all year long on virtually all programs on all broadcast and cable stations.

    Give it a try. Best of all TV captions are absolutely free!

    For Extra Help at Home,
    Free TV Captions for Reading Practice

    When a student wants to practice reading the printed word, where is the easiest place to find help?

    Right in your television set when you turn on the TV captions. TV captions become your free reading tutor.

    TV captions create a wonderful chance for a learner to connect the sound of the spoken word with the sight of the printed word in the context of the action on the screen to explain and reinforce the meaning of the words.

    It’s almost like having the story read aloud.

    Since January 2006, by federal mandate, TV captions are available in homes and everywhere else 20 out of 24 hours a day (usually not between 2am & 6am) every day all year long on virtually all programs on all broadcast and cable stations.

    Over 20 years of research has validated the concept that TV captions can help learning to read, see the list of research articles at http://www.captionsforliteracy.org.

    Now that the research has been done and the federal laws are in place, you can turn on the priceless free resource of TV captions with a touch of the CC button on the remote control or by the use of the television’s menu.

    Give it a try yourself. TV captions are free!

What’s this?

You are currently reading Captioning Coming Up! at CCAC Blog.

meta

%d bloggers like this: